The City of Grand Junction proposed two issues in the November ballot to address the affordable housing crisis: a 1% increase in the lodging tax and an 8% short-term rental tax.

If the measures pass, the funds will go to affordable housing projects and initiatives for people earning 80% of the region’s median income or less.






Anna Stout, Mayor of Grand Junction.










Lodging tax

Barton Glasser/The Daily Sentinel

Vera Kusal, left, outgoing executive director of the Horizon Drive district, and new director Jonathan Purdy walk on Horizon Drive on Friday. The group recently wrote a letter on behalf of the Horizon Drive Business Improvement District opposing the city’s lodging tax increase.










Lodging tax

Barton Glasser/The Daily Sentinel

Tom Levalley sits outside his home, which also contains short and long term rental accommodation, in the 400 block of Chipeta Avenue in Grand Junction. Levalley opposes the city’s lodging tax increase, saying it would put him at a disadvantage against short-term rentals outside the city limits.










Lodging tax

Tom Levally stands in front of his home, which also contains short- and long-term rental units, on the 400 block of Chipeta Avenue in Grand Junction, Colorado, Friday, Oct. 7, 2022. Levally opposes the increase of the city’s lodging tax, saying it would put him at a disadvantage for short-term rentals outside the city limits. Photo by Barton Glasser