The aim of the planning law review is to create a planning law that will respond very well to modern planning principles and practices, including development controls, said Minister of Local Government, Education , Heritage and Arts, Premila Kumar.

“Having the right legal framework, financial support and human capacity are necessary for effective planning,” Ms Kumar said.

“I had previously informed this House that the Department for Local Government was reviewing the enabling legislation to ensure it was fit for purpose.”

She said the Town and Country Planning Act of 1946 and the Subdivision Act of 1937 no longer served their interests.

“Unfortunately, our planning and development guidelines cannot support new thinking in planning, supported by innovative designs and technologies.

“Since 1946, minor changes have been made to these laws, in particular to the definitions and the inclusion of new planning areas as part of the planning by-laws.

“These amendments were made until 1973. However, since then there have been no further amendments and a revised edition of the law, bearing all the amendments, was published in 1978.

“We know that a law that is 70 or even 50 years old is no longer relevant in the area of ​​planning.

“What we want for Fiji are laws that will create sustainable and resilient cities and towns. Laws that are forward-looking and adaptable to changing needs.

“The objective of the review is to create a planning law that will respond very well to modern planning principles and practices, including development controls.”

She said that although the existing laws have the basic planning and land use control provisions which are still applied today, the provisions cover planning issues and land use control matters. land use planning that applied to development in recent decades.

“Development planning and control over the past few decades to the present has evolved significantly around the world, with new planning principles and techniques being introduced to respond to the changes.”